Tory Cronyism

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James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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40 grand bonus for Dominic Cummings. £22 billion for failed Serco Test and Trace. Over £1 billion in contracts for their mates and cronies.

But they then vote for £1,000 a year cuts for 6 million families struggling to make ends meet in the most difficult circumstances.

And people wonder why I utterly loathe and detest these shower of conmen, frauds and charlatans. Twenty friggin quid a week. Twenty measly quid a week. Is that too much to ask?

No emoji sums up the anger and contempt I have for this “government”
Just worked out that if I was on the National minimum wage and working 40 hours per eeek I’d be on about £18k gross. After tax and NI I’d be left with circa £15700 or take home pay of £1,315 every month, £303 per week / £60.60. Now let’s say my rent is £500 pcm (incl council tax), heating / lighting etc £10 pw, travel to work £20pw. This would leave £735 or £183 pw remaining. Now imagine you’ve got two kids to clothe and feed. Then just imagine what a massive difference £20 a week would make to your life......
 
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Knutsfordian

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Just worked out that if I was on the National minimum wage and working 40 hours per eeek I’d be on about £18k gross. After tax and NI I’d be left with circa £15700 or take home pay of £1,315 every month, £303 per week / £60.60. Now let’s say my rent is £500 pcm (incl council tax), heating / lighting etc £10 pw, travel to work £20pw. This would leave £735 or £183 pw remaining. Now imagine you’ve got two kids to clothe and feed. Then just imagine what a massive difference £20 a week would make to your life......
Perhaps I am missing something - but it didn't get voted down?

The argument about it being £20 a week is a little erroneous - its about spending another £,6000,000,000 on welfare and is the right way to spend it? This £6 Billion will also then rise year on year, so its not a once and done spend but a material increase in welfare spending. Remember tax credits cost £3billion when uplifted in 2003 compared to nigh on £30 billion today. So banging on that its only a measly £20 doesn't hold water. The numbers above also don't take account of the universal and child credits that would be received by someone on minimum wage
 
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James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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Perhaps I am missing something - but it didn't get voted down?

The argument about it being £20 a week is a little erroneous - its about spending another £,6000,000,000 on welfare and is the right way to spend it? This £6 Billion will also then rise year on year, so its not a once and done spend but a material increase in welfare spending. Remember tax credits cost £3billion when uplifted in 2003 compared to nigh on £30 billion today. So banging on that its only a measly £20 doesn't hold water. The numbers above also don't take account of the universal and child credits that would be received by someone on minimum wage
You know what Knutsfordian, you really are all heart. Go explain your rationale to someone in the position I set out and see what reaction you get.

Remind me, how much money have this government pledged towards increased defence spending? £14 Bn?

I know where I would want the money to go....
 

Knutsfordian

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You know what Knutsfordian, you really are all heart. Go explain your rationale to someone in the position I set out and see what reaction you get.

Remind me, how much money have this government pledged towards increased defence spending? £14 Bn?

I know where I would want the money to go....

That's why we have elections so that the prospective governments can lay out the rationale in their manifestos and then individuals can make their decision and vote accordingly
 

James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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Just worked out that if I was on the National minimum wage and working 40 hours per eeek I’d be on about £18k gross. After tax and NI I’d be left with circa £15700 or take home pay of £1,315 every month, £303 per week / £60.60. Now let’s say my rent is £500 pcm (incl council tax), heating / lighting etc £10 pw, travel to work £20pw. This would leave £735 or £183 pw remaining. Now imagine you’ve got two kids to clothe and feed. Then just imagine what a massive difference £20 a week would make to your life......
 
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Knutsfordian

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Dec 18, 2014
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The question that needs to be asked is whether the contracts were fulfilled and whether the taxpayer received value for the money paid out. If not, then those managing these contracts need to ensure that remedial action is taken, the position rectified and any penalty clauses, that the contracts would have contained, executed.

Whilst it might stir a few souls to lead the charge by accusing the government of cronyism, the reality is that most folks won't give a toss if the contracts delivered - and if they didn't the supplier managers should be on the case. The real story here is in how much public money has been lost to contracts that didn't deliver during this pandemic and what, if anything, has been done about it.
 

James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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The question that needs to be asked is whether the contracts were fulfilled and whether the taxpayer received value for the money paid out. If not, then those managing these contracts need to ensure that remedial action is taken, the position rectified and any penalty clauses, that the contracts would have contained, executed.

Whilst it might stir a few souls to lead the charge by accusing the government of cronyism, the reality is that most folks won't give a toss if the contracts delivered - and if they didn't the supplier managers should be on the case. The real story here is in how much public money has been lost to contracts that didn't deliver during this pandemic and what, if anything, has been done about it.
And who was responsible for those contracts? This bunch of cronies, liars and charlatans! So in the end it is they who are responsible for this huge wastage and mismanagement of taxpayers money. The buck stops with them.
 

James Wood

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And who was responsible for those contracts? This bunch of cronies, liars and charlatans! So in the end it is they who are responsible for this huge wastage and mismanagement of taxpayers money. The buck stops with them.
More cronyism and shocking waste of public funds. And this affects school kids! 😡😡

 

Knutsfordian

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More cronyism and shocking waste of public funds. And this affects school kids! 😡😡

Computacentre is a public listed company with 16,000 employees, revenues of over £5billion and huge client list in both private and public sectors.

One of its founders - Sir Philip Hume donated most of the money he received from the floatation of the company to charity in 1998 and stepped down from being Chairman of Computacentre in 2001 but remains a non exec director as does the other founder, Peter Ogden.

So the link between Sir Philip and his wife donating to the Conservative party as individual donors and Computacentre's cock up in delivering these PCs is tenuous in the extreme.
 

James Wood

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Knutsfordian

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And the premise of this really is a nonsense - its like saying we have paid £billions in benefits to Labour Party and Trade Union members. Is that cronyism too?

Business people donate to the tory party because they think the Conservatives will give them a better business focussed government. Always have and always will.
 

toddyb

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Dec 23, 2014
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The above two statements are crap Knutsfordian,and even you with your tunnelled vision must laugh when you read them.You are making yourself look like what you called a certain politician the other day.
 

Alan M

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And the premise of this really is a nonsense - its like saying we have paid £billions in benefits to Labour Party and Trade Union members. Is that cronyism too?

Sorry, that's a total and utter non sequitur as a counter-argument to the way in which contracts have been awarded in secret and without a tendering process, and then without the required publicaton of contract details, a point which in itself is enough to raise suspicions and is then exacerbated by the govt employing expensive lawyers (at huge taxpayer expense) to fight in court attempts to get them published (while at the same time conceding that they should have been published). The impression created is that they think they can get away with anything as long as they brick wall for long enough.
 

Alan M

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Coincidentally this just in from Good Law Project ... (and I'll even countenance praise for the Mail in this)

1612614693443.png
 

Knutsfordian

Too much time on my hands
Dec 18, 2014
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Sorry, that's a total and utter non sequitur as a counter-argument to the way in which contracts have been awarded in secret and without a tendering process, and then without the required publicaton of contract details, a point which in itself is enough to raise suspicions and is then exacerbated by the govt employing expensive lawyers (at huge taxpayer expense) to fight in court attempts to get them published (while at the same time conceding that they should have been publishedif (hypothetically) ). The impression created is that they think they can get away with anything as long as they brick wall for long enough.
My point is that because businesses win government contracts, doesn't mean they are being rewarded for for their support. At one point it was really quite the norm for businesses to declare (or not!) donations to political parties within their accounts. Many companies have ceased making political donations all together, so more often than not execs make donations in their own name.

The point I was making with regard to benefits was say Labour (hypothetically) did win an election by promising to increase benefits in return for a vote at an election, what's the difference? Both are equally as absurd in assuming rewards given for the individuals' support.

I am absolutely in favour of people being prosecuted where there has been corruption. Such people do not belong in public life - just as the Labour major of LIverpool has recently found out. In this pandemic I am sure short cuts have been taken and tendering processes not adhered to in order to make sure that goods and services were delivered. I suspect the same has been true of the vaccinations delivery where Pharma companies across the globe have benefitted from huge cash injections of UK taxpayers money, at high risk, to deliver vaccines which are currently sitting in the arms of over 11 million UK residents. I don't hear anyone complaining about lack of vaccine tendering processes and procurement rules not being obeyed in this case !
 

James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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And the premise of this really is a nonsense - its like saying we have paid £billions in benefits to Labour Party and Trade Union members. Is that cronyism too?

Business people donate to the tory party because they think the Conservatives will give them a better business focussed government. Always have and always will.
Remind me. Who was it who not so long ago said “f**k business”.
 

Edge

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James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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My point is that because businesses win government contracts, doesn't mean they are being rewarded for for their support. At one point it was really quite the norm for businesses to declare (or not!) donations to political parties within their accounts. Many companies have ceased making political donations all together, so more often than not execs make donations in their own name.

The point I was making with regard to benefits was say Labour (hypothetically) did win an election by promising to increase benefits in return for a vote at an election, what's the difference? Both are equally as absurd in assuming rewards given for the individuals' support.

I am absolutely in favour of people being prosecuted where there has been corruption. Such people do not belong in public life - just as the Labour major of LIverpool has recently found out. In this pandemic I am sure short cuts have been taken and tendering processes not adhered to in order to make sure that goods and services were delivered. I suspect the same has been true of the vaccinations delivery where Pharma companies across the globe have benefitted from huge cash injections of UK taxpayers money, at high risk, to deliver vaccines which are currently sitting in the arms of over 11 million UK residents. I don't hear anyone complaining about lack of vaccine tendering processes and procurement rules not being obeyed in this case !
No one is complaining as yet as the skeletons are still on the cupboard! 😉
 

James Wood

Legend
Jun 1, 2017
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Sorry, that's a total and utter non sequitur as a counter-argument to the way in which contracts have been awarded in secret and without a tendering process, and then without the required publicaton of contract details, a point which in itself is enough to raise suspicions and is then exacerbated by the govt employing expensive lawyers (at huge taxpayer expense) to fight in court attempts to get them published (while at the same time conceding that they should have been published). The impression created is that they think they can get away with anything as long as they brick wall for long enough.
I wouldn’t use the term non sequitur Alan. I’d use “utter and total bollocks”.😉
 
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