Theresa May says 95% of Brexit deal is done

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James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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Knutsfordian

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Dec 18, 2014
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“The more we succeed the worse it will get.”

The latest figures clearly show that we are well behind the curve re our economy bouncing back after the pandemic when compared to many other of our EU and worldwide competitors 😡

Not sure that's true. The UK economy (according to KPMG)is expected to grow about 6.5% this years and reach pre-pandemic levels by 1st quarter 2022, and Deloittes reckon the UK will outperform the EU over the next few years, Looks like some folks are just too happy to run the UK down to make the story fit their prejudices.
 

James Wood

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The ever brilliant and acerbic Mark Steel hitting the nail on the head!
More Brexshit benefits! And not the words of a comedian this time. Someone who is at the sharp end - as are the fishermen - of the reality of this disastrous decision 😡
 

Knutsfordian

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Dec 18, 2014
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More Brexshit benefits! And not the words of a comedian this time. Someone who is at the sharp end - as are the fishermen - of the reality of this disastrous decision 😡
come on James give us a clue :)

Not that it matters really, It's done, over, finished, no return and no regrets either !
 

James Wood

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come on James give us a clue :)

Not that it matters really, It's done, over, finished, no return and no regrets either !
So no regrets then eh? Tell that to the small, hard working individual businesses and enterprises that have been left to pick up the shit that has resulted from Brexshit.
 

Knutsfordian

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So no regrets then eh? Tell that to the small, hard working individual businesses and enterprises that have been left to pick up the shit that has resulted from Brexshit.
None what so ever.

The impact of Brexit is muddled with the impact of Covid, so it's difficult to see what the real impact of Brexit is and how businesses need to be supported, but in any event going back to the EU isn't a sensible option any more.
 

James Wood

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None what so ever.

The impact of Brexit is muddled with the impact of Covid, so it's difficult to see what the real impact of Brexit is and how businesses need to be supported, but in any event going back to the EU isn't a sensible option any more.
Difficult to pin this one on Covid

1623773007894.jpeg
 

Knutsfordian

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So is the overall impact not worth bothering about or is it cataclysmic for farmers? You can't have it both ways.

The other point is that Australia versus the EU isn't one or the other - we don't have to trade with one at the expense of the other.

Australia is also one of our closest security allies and part of the 5 eyes group. Makes sense to have an FTA with a country we are close to anyway and I suspect the first of many more to come - based on trade and not political and fiscal union !!!!
 

Andy

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The other point is that Australia versus the EU isn't one or the other - we don't have to trade with one at the expense of the other.

Exactly. Some people thing everything is black or white. There are many shades of grey.

The reaction on social media to any trade deal done with some one outside of Europe is comical. Some remainers come across as European Supremisists sometimes.
 

Knutsfordian

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So now Ireland are worried that their beef exports worth £.6 billion per annum to the UK will be threatened by the Australia trade deal and Liz Truss has told the EU the UK will import 200,000 tons less of EU beef in 2022 than in 2020.

And so it begins ................. cheaper better food for UK consumers without all the EU protectionist rules. About time too !!
 

James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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So is the overall impact not worth bothering about or is it cataclysmic for farmers? You can't have it both ways.

The other point is that Australia versus the EU isn't one or the other - we don't have to trade with one at the expense of the other.

Australia is also one of our closest security allies and part of the 5 eyes group. Makes sense to have an FTA with a country we are close to anyway and I suspect the first of many more to come - based on trade and not political and fiscal union !!!!
So now Ireland are worried that their beef exports worth £.6 billion per annum to the UK will be threatened by the Australia trade deal and Liz Truss has told the EU the UK will import 200,000 tons less of EU beef in 2022 than in 2020.

And so it begins ................. cheaper better food for UK consumers without all the EU protectionist rules. About time too !!
Cheaper and better? Says who?
 

James Wood

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Jun 1, 2017
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Exactly. Some people thing everything is black or white. There are many shades of grey.

The reaction on social media to any trade deal done with some one outside of Europe is comical. Some remainers come across as European Supremisists sometimes.
And most Brexiteers come across as English supremacists. Cuts both ways Andy….
 

Knutsfordian

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Dec 18, 2014
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Cheaper and better? Says who?
The value of Irish beef exports should have read £1.6billion, so sorry about that.

Well given that the the Irish are worried about being undercut, there will be a hoohaa if that isn't reflected in the prices paid by consumers in the UK. At the very least it adds some real competition into the agriculture sector. It also might mean cheaper foods in the EU with an extra 200,000 tons of beef trying to find a new market ?

The bottom line is that at long last there is a challenge to the fixed EU markets which should provide some genuine alternatives for consumers - and the people I know living in Australia and the US have absolutely no issues regarding food standards in those countries. We have been had for mugs for far too long.
 

James Wood

Too much time on my hands
Jun 1, 2017
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The value of Irish beef exports should have read £1.6billion, so sorry about that.

Well given that the the Irish are worried about being undercut, there will be a hoohaa if that isn't reflected in the prices paid by consumers in the UK. At the very least it adds some real competition into the agriculture sector. It also might mean cheaper foods in the EU with an extra 200,000 tons of beef trying to find a new market ?

The bottom line is that at long last there is a challenge to the fixed EU markets which should provide some genuine alternatives for consumers - and the people I know living in Australia and the US have absolutely no issues regarding food standards in those countries. We have been had for mugs for far too long.
More Brexshit benefits! 🤫

 

Knutsfordian

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Dec 18, 2014
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Not the best news but some of it will be down to stock piling and Covid. Exports to non EU countries is stable so the relationship with the EU has chance to stabilise too. In overall terms I think the amount involved is circa £2billion, with something similar being lost in the opposite direction. Lets take a view after 50 years !!
 

Knutsfordian

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Dec 18, 2014
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Couple of comments re the above

AZ didn't make a mess of their contracts. As with all suppliers they leave themselves a "get out of jail card" with the "best endeavours" or force majeure clauses. It was up to the EU to put contingency measures in place, which they palpably failed to do. Given that these contracts are being drawn up and signed when the development was still in progress and production volumes were always estimated, there were always going to be risks associated with this process. AZ made sure they were covered and the EU didn't. You mention the part played by the UK government - but we don't know what's in the AZ/UK contract and what conditions were included given the UK's considerable development funding of both AZ and Oxford University. I think that the UK government was quite happy for AZ and EU to sort this out between themselves until the EU made it an international dispute with the intention to impose Article 16. It was a completely over the top, panic response from an EU team out of their depth. References to Boris enacting Article 16 and the single markets bill are completely erroneous. The SM bill was a deliberate act in response to the EU threat not to give the UK a free trade agreement as promised by Tusk and Johnson admitted he would use the Article if the conditions dictated so. To say no would be like having the nuclear keys, but not using them at the crunch.

At the heart of this is the EU's arrogance. They think because they are "the 27" that everyone will bow down to them and treat them as demi gods. Pharma companies like AZ can look after themselves and have the financial and intellectual muscle to take on the EU, particularly where its the EU that need this vaccine. AZ will be able to sell however much they can make, irrespective of the EU's requirements. The EU have gone down completely the wrong path in this dispute. Where they are today - going into a meeting with the Pharma companies to see what can be done, should have been the EU's first step, not the last. Sheer arrogance and incompetence by the EU

I agree with your last sentence, however I think there will be more to come (not necessarily with the EU) The WHO want us to stop our vaccination programme after the most vulnerable are vaccinated. Whilst I can see the logic to try and save more lives, politically it would not wash in the UK. Time will tell.
So it looks like the EU have lost their case against AZ


Quelle surprise !!
 

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